November 30, 2021

History

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History repeats itself: Untested vaccines, adverse events and vaccine rollout suspensions

Judi Roberts was a perfectly healthy young woman when she took a swine flu vaccine in November 1976. Two weeks later, she felt numbness starting up her legs, and by the following week, she was totally paralyzed.

Roberts, the wife of Polk Republican Party Chairman Gene Roberts, was a quadriplegic for six months and confined mostly to a wheelchair for over a year. She was diagnosed with Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS), a rare disorder in which the body’s immune system attacks the nerves. Weakness and tingling in the extremities are usually the first symptoms of the disease.

In a 1979 interview with the CBS investigative news program “60 Minutes,” Roberts related that, at that time, she felt vaccination was her only chance to survive a potential “major epidemic.”

“I’d never taken any other flu shots, but I felt like this was going to be a major epidemic, and the only way to prevent a major epidemic of a really deadly variety of flu was for everybody to be immunized,” she told host Mike Wallace. “If this disease is so potentially fatal that it’s going to kill a young, healthy man, a middle-aged schoolteacher doesn’t have a prayer.”

It all began at an Army training base in New Jersey. In February 1976, several soldiers at Fort Dix fell ill with flu-like symptoms. Testing revealed that the virus had spread to more than 200 recruits.

An Army doctor sent samples of their throat cultures to the New Jersey Public Health Lab to find out what kind of virus was going around. One of those samples was from Private David Lewis, who had left his sickbed to go on a forced march. Lewis had collapsed on that march and died a few days later.

The New Jersey lab identified the normal kind of flu virus going around that year in most of the soldiers’ throat cultures. Swine flu was only identified in the throat cultures from Lewis and four other soldiers, who recovered completely without the swine flu vaccine.

“If I had known at that time that the boy had been in a sick bed, got up, went out on a forced march and then collapsed and died, I would never have taken the shot,” Roberts said.

You can watch the “60 Minutes” feature on swine flu “scamdemic” here:

Scientists give advice based on incomplete knowledge then and now

Following the much-publicized swine flu “outbreak” at Fort Dix, President Gerald Ford convened a high-profile meeting of scientists to decide if there should be a vaccination program. However, “this was interpreted to be a political event rather than a scientific process,” according to David Sencer, the then-director of the Center for Disease Control, now known as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Like what happened throughout the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the scientists in 1976 could only give the best advice they had based on incomplete knowledge. Many public health officials were skeptical and uncertain too, including Pascal Imperato – the deputy health commissioner and the chair of the task force charged with rolling out the swine flu vaccination program in New York at that time.

“I think all of us were in agreement that yes, it’s probably unlikely but we can’t be absolutely sure,” Imperato said, talking about the possibility of a swine flu pandemic and whether or not a vaccination program was needed then.

In March 1976, Ford announced a $137 million effort to produce a vaccine by the autumn. “Its goal was to immunize every man, woman and child in the U.S., and thus was the largest and most ambitious immunization program ever undertaken in the country,” wrote Pascal Imperato in a 2015 paper reflecting on the events.

Around 46 million Americans took the vaccine. Some 4,000 people suffered devastating side effects from the vaccine. They sued the government for damages amounting to $3.5 billion. Two-thirds of the claims were for neurological damage that led to death in some cases.

Untested swine flu vaccine may have been used on millions of Americans

Nearly everyone received the swine flu vaccine in a public health facility where a doctor might not be present. Thus, it was up to the CDC to come up with an official consent form that would give the public all the information needed about the swine flu vaccine. The form stated that the swine flu vaccine had been tested.

But the form didn’t mention that the scientists developed another vaccine and that it was the one mostly used in the swine flu vaccination program. That vaccine was called “X-53a.” Sencer, appearing in the same episode of “60 Minutes” in which Roberts was interviewed, couldn’t give a direct answer when Wallace asked him whether X-53a had been tested.

With hindsight, it’s easy to see that the fears at the time were unfounded. The swine flu strain spotted at Fort Dix was not dangerous at all and there would be no pandemic. Later, researchers discovered that benign swine flu strains had been circulating in the U.S. population long before the one identified at the military base.

Thousands suffered and hundreds died from the mass vaccination efforts by the government in 1976 to combat a pandemic that never happened.

Millions of vaccinations resulted to dozens of GBS cases. The syndrome was less understood in the 1970s. Research has since found that the chances of developing the condition after vaccination are extremely small, but the scale of the 1976 rollout meant that a handful of people were bound to be affected.

The vaccine-inflicted GBS in 1976 caused suffering among an unlucky group of people, including Roberts. After months of negative media coverage, reports of GBS cases brought an end to the swine flu affair. Ford’s program was suspended in December 1976 with just over 20 percent of the U.S. population vaccinated.

More at:

https://www.naturalnews.com/2021-11-21-adverse-events-lead-to-vaccine-rollout-suspensions.html

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When a secret president ran the country

Protective of both her husband’s reputation and power, Edith Wilson shielded Woodrow from interlopers and embarked on a bedside government that essentially excluded Wilson’s staff, the Cabinet and the Congress

Woodrow Wilson may have been one of our hardest-working chief executives and by the fall of 1919, he looked it.

For most of the six months between late Dec. 1918 and June 1919, our 28th president was in Europe negotiating the Treaty of Versailles and planning for the nascent League of Nations, efforts for which he was awarded the 1919 Nobel Peace Prize (an award he did not officially receive until 1920). Back home, however, the ratification of the treaty met with mixed public support and strong opposition from Republican senators, led by Henry Cabot Lodge (R-Mass.), as well as Irish Catholic Democrats. As the summer progressed, President Wilson worried that defeat was in the air.

Bone-tired but determined to wage peace, on Sept. 3, 1919, Woodrow Wilson embarked on a national speaking tour across the United States so that he could make his case directly to the American people. For the next three and a half weeks, the president, his wife Edith Bolling Galt Wilson, assorted aides, servants, cooks, Secret Service men and members of the press rode the rails. The presidential train car, quaintly named the Mayflower, served as a rolling White House. Also joining the party was the president’s personal physician, Cary T. Grayson, who had grave concerns over his patient’s health.

All during September of 1919, as the presidential train traveled across the Midwest, into the Great Plains states, over the Rockies into the Pacific Northwest and then down the West Coast before turning back East, the president became thinner, paler and ever more frail. He lost his appetite, his asthma grew worse and he complained of unrelenting headaches.

Unfortunately, Woodrow Wilson refused to listen to his body.

He had too much important work to do. Combining his considerable skills as a professor, scholar of history, political science and government, orator and politician, he threw himself into the task of convincing the skeptics and preaching to the choir on the importance of ratifying the treaty and joining the League of Nations. At many of the “whistle stops,” vociferous critics heckled and shouted down his proposals. In the Senate, his political opponents criticized Wilson’s diplomacy, complained that the treaty reduced the Congress’s power to declare war, and ultimately voted the treaty down…..

Late on the evening of Sept. 25, 1919, after speaking in Pueblo, Colorado, Edith discovered Woodrow in a profound state of illness; his facial muscles were twitching uncontrollably and he was experiencing severe nausea. Earlier in the day, he complained of a splitting headache.

Six weeks after the event, Dr. Grayson told a journalist that he had noted a “curious drag or looseness at the left side of [Wilson’s] mouth — a sign of danger that could no longer be obscured.” In retrospect, this event may have been a transient ischemic attack (TIA), the medical term for a brief loss of blood flow to the brain, or “mini-stroke,” which can be a harbinger for a much worse cerebrovascular event to follow — in other words, a full-fledged stroke.

On Sept. 26, the president’s private secretary, Joseph Tumulty, announced that the rest of the speaking tour had been canceled because the president was suffering from “a nervous reaction in his digestive organs.” The Mayflower sped directly back to Washington’s Union Station. Upon arrival, on Sept. 28, the president appeared ill but was able to walk on his own accord through the station. He tipped his hat to awaiting crowd, shook the hands of a few of the people along the track’s platform, and was whisked away to the White House for an enforced period of rest and examination by a battery of doctors.

Everything changed on the morning of Oct. 2, 1919. According to some accounts, the president awoke to find his left hand numb to sensation before falling into unconsciousness. In other versions, Wilson had his stroke on the way to the bathroom and fell to the floor with Edith dragging him back into bed. However those events transpired, immediately after the president’s collapse, Mrs. Wilson discretely phoned down to the White House chief usher, Ike Hoover and told him to “please get Dr. Grayson, the president is very sick.”

Grayson quickly arrived. Ten minutes later, he emerged from the presidential bedroom and the doctor’s diagnosis was terrible: “My God, the president is paralyzed,” Grayson declared.

By February of 1920, news of the president’s stroke began to be reported in the press. Nevertheless, the full details of Woodrow Wilson’s disability, and his wife’s management of his affairs, were not entirely understood by the American public at the time.

Over the last century, historians have continued to dig into the proceedings of the Wilson administration and it has become clear that Edith Wilson acted as much more than a mere “steward.” She was, essentially, the nation’s chief executive until her husband’s second term concluded in March of 1921. Nearly three years later, Woodrow Wilson died in his Washington, D.C., home, at 2340 S Street, NW, at 11:15 AM on Sunday, Feb. 3, 1924.

According to the Feb. 4 issue of The New York Times, the former president uttered his last sentence on Friday, Feb. 1: “I am a broken piece of machinery. When the machinery is broken — I am ready.” And on Saturday, Feb. 2, he spoke his last word: Edith.

As we look forward to the presidential campaign of 2016, it seems appropriate to recall that Oct. 2, 1919, may well mark the first time in American history a woman became de-facto president of the United States, even if Edith Wilson never officially held the post. Indeed, the prolonged blockage of blood flow to his brain changed more than the course of Woodrow Wilson’s life; it changed the course of history.

More at:

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/health/woodrow-wilson-stroke

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History Thursday: When the Supreme Court said yes to vaccine mandates

The ruling didn’t allow the government to force vaccination against Jacobson’s will — only to levy the fine against him. Harlan’s opinion also emphasized medical exemptions in its application.

The vaccine mandate debate may be rejuvenated, but it’s hardly new.

The U.S. Supreme Court answered the can-they-do-that question more than 115 years ago.

In an era when infectious diseases killed more Americans than any other cause of death, smallpox was ripping through Cambridge, Massachusetts. State lawmakers passed a statute allowing local boards of health, “if it is necessary for the public health or safety,” to require vaccination among all those 21-and-up, or levy a $5 fine (at least $140 today, adjusted for inflation).

Henning Jacobson, a middle-aged minister, contested the charges, and his case made it to the U.S. Supreme Court. He argued the vaccines caused injury and posed a danger to recipients. The mandate invaded his liberty.

In a 7-2 decision in 1905, the court upheld the law. Justice John Marshall Harlan wrote a majority opinion, noting the century of understanding from physicians that vaccines prevent the spread of infectious disease. The chance of vaccine injury exists, but that risk is “too small to be seriously weighed” against the benefits of vaccination, the court ruled.

The liberty established by the U.S. Constitution, he wrote, isn’t an absolute right for every person to always be freed from all restraint.

“In every well-ordered society charged with the duty of conserving the safety of its members, the rights of the individual in respect of his liberty may at times, under the pressure of great dangers, be subjected to such restraint, to be enforced by reasonable regulations, as the safety of the general public may demand,” he wrote.

The ruling didn’t allow the government to force vaccination against Jacobson’s will — only to levy the fine against him. Harlan’s opinion also emphasized medical exemptions in its application.

It’s unclear to what extent Jacobson v. Massachusetts could apply to President Joe Biden’s announced plan to require large employers to require either COVID-19 vaccination or weekly testing of employees. The ruling established states’ power to mandate vaccination, not necessarily the federal government (though analysis from the nonpartisan Congressional Research Service suggested federal law could form the basis for executive action).

It was a different time. There was no Food and Drug Administration, no regulation of research and no doctrine of informed consent, all in the face of a disease that killed as many as one in three victims, according to a a review of the case in a 2005 article in the American Journal of Public Health.

“The Supreme Court had no difficulty upholding the state’s power to grant the board of health authority to order a general vaccination program during an epidemic,” the authors wrote.

Less than 20 years later, the court relied on Jacobson to uphold another case brought by Texas woman named Rosalyn Zucht who refused vaccination and challenged a statute prohibiting schoolchildren from enrolling in public or private schools unless they received a smallpox vaccine. Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis wrote that the court had already “settled that it is within the police power of a state to provide for compulsory vaccination.”

The precedent was groundbreaking, but the aftermath wasn’t always pretty.

The Supreme Court cited Jacobson as precedent to justify a ruling that allowed for the involuntary sterilization of the “feeble minded.” More than 60,000 Americans, mostly poor women in state mental institutions, were sterilized by 1978, according to the AJPH article.

“The principle that sustains compulsory vaccination is broad enough to cover cutting the Fallopian tubes,” Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes wrote for the court in a majority opinion in 1927.

The Jacobson ruling also sparked an explosion within the anti-vaccine movement. According to a 2008 article in the Harvard Law Review, the Anti-Vaccination League of America was founded in Philadelphia by 1908, with the court’s holding in mind.

At its founding conference, its founder addressed his listeners with rhetoric laced with echoes of cries from conservatives and anti-vaccination activists of today.

“We have repudiated religious tyranny; we have rejected political tyranny; shall we now submit to medical tyranny?” he asked.

More at: https://ohiocapitaljournal.com/2021/09/16/history-thursday-when-the-supreme-court-said-yes-to-vaccine-mandates/

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