May 18, 2024

Tim Robbins Slams Top Democrats for Threatening Journalist Matt Taibbi with Jail over Twitter Files

“Mainstream media have not only ignored the story but now attack the journalists, effectively serving as a thuggish censorship arm of the government”

Tim Robbins Slams Top Democrats for Threatening Journalist Matt Taibbi with Jail over Twitter Files

Hollywood star Tim Robbins has slammed prominent Democrat lawmakers for threatening to jail independent journalist Matt Taibbi over his reporting on the Twitter Files, which showed large-scale collusion between the federal government and Twitter to censor conservatives.

Hollywood star Tim Robbins has slammed prominent Democrat lawmakers for threatening to jail independent journalist Matt Taibbi over his reporting on the Twitter Files, which showed large-scale collusion between the federal government and Twitter to censor conservatives.

In a scorching tweet posted Monday, Tim Robbins specifically named Reps. Hakeem Jefferies and Jerry Nadler (D-NY), as well as Virgin Islands delegate Stacey Plaskett, saying it is now an “embarrassing, shameful time for the Democrats and the ‘free’ press.”

Democrats are threatening to throw Matt Taibbi in jail for his reporting on the Twitter Files, which showed how federal law enforcement agencies worked with Twitter to suppress conservative views and voices.  He has also reported on the government’s attempts to censor Google and Facebook.

Taibbi has also been outspoken about the mainstream news media’s ongoing attempts to censor the Hunter Biden scandal. Many news outlets falsely called the Hunter Biden laptop scandal “Russian disinformation” in an attempt to bury the story in the weeks just before the 2020 presidential election.

In his tweet Monday, Robbins blasted the mainstream news media for trying to cover up the Twitter scandal.

“Mainstream media have not only ignored the story but now attack the journalists, effectively serving as a thuggish censorship arm of the government,” the Oscar-winning Mystic River actor wrote. “What an embarrassing, shameful time for the Democrats and the ‘free’ press. You are losing any shred of credibility you had, you ff’ing fools.”

More at:



Tucker Carlson fired from Fox News on Rupert Murdoch’s orders, report says

Tucker Carlson fired from Fox News on Rupert Murdoch’s orders, report says

It comes after the network paid millions to resolve a defamation lawsuit over election misinformation claims

Tucker Carlson, America’s best-known conservative TV anchor, was reportedly sacked on the orders of Rupert Murdoch over lawsuits concerning the Fox host.

Carlson’s abrupt departure after more than a decade as a key face of Fox News stunned even fellow colleagues at the network.

Company insiders told the Los Angeles Times the decision to fire Carlson came directly from the company’s chairman, Rupert Murdoch.

The 53-year-old star’s termination related to a lawsuit filed by a former producer, Abby Grossberg, accusing Carlson and male producers of presiding over a misogynistic workplace, the newspaper reported.

Ms Grossberg also alleges she was coerced by Fox’s lawyers into providing a misleading deposition in a defamation case brought by Dominion Voting Systems.

Carlson’s senior executive producer, Justin Wells, has also reportedly been terminated.

More at:


Emerald Robinson Breaks Down the Fox Firing of Tucker Carlson

The Absolute Truth with @EmeraldRobinson on Twitter: “The divorce between Fox News and Tucker Carlson should have been expected.The network wasn’t prepared to let their top talent tell the truth.@EmeraldRobinson shares her thoughts on the break up. pic.twitter.com/nZF6Gk2Ron / Twitter”

The divorce between Fox News and Tucker Carlson should have been expected.The network wasn’t prepared to let their top talent tell the truth.@EmeraldRobinson shares her thoughts on the break up. pic.twitter.com/nZF6Gk2Ron


Brain Dead FOX News Puts Brian Kilmeade on the Air at 8 PM on First Night Without Tucker Carlson

Brain Dead FOX News Puts Brian Kilmeade on the Air at 8 PM on First Night Without Tucker Carlson | The Gateway Pundit | by Mike LaChance

On their first night without Tucker Carlson, the geniuses at FOX News filled the 8 PM slot with Brian Kilmeade, who is about as interesting as a room-temperature glass of milk.

On their first night without Tucker Carlson, the genuises at FOX News filled the 8 PM slot with Brian Kilmeade, who is about as interesting as a room-temperature glass of milk.

Kilmeade opened the show by devoting about 30 seconds to the departure of Tucker from the network.

Millions of people across the country scrambled to get their remote controls at that moment.

Collin Rugg on Twitter: “Brian Kilmeade takes over for ‘Fox News Tonight’ in replace of Tucker Carlson.Great show if you are wanting to fall asleep.Fox News is dead.pic.twitter.com/eNL3aYzLAC / Twitter”

Brian Kilmeade takes over for ‘Fox News Tonight’ in replace of Tucker Carlson.Great show if you are wanting to fall asleep.Fox News is dead.pic.twitter.com/eNL3aYzLAC

FOX News really doesn’t seem to understand their audience at all.

More at:


How Rupert Murdoch’s Media Empire Benefited from Selling Reagan’s CIA Propaganda

Murdoch, who became a naturalized citizen of the United States in 1985 to meet a regulatory requirement that U.S. TV stations must be owned by Americans, benefited from his close ties to both U.S. and British officialdom.

How Rupert Murdoch’s Media Empire Benefited from Selling Reagan’s CIA Propaganda

Right-wing media began expanding in the 1980s as the Reagan administration coordinated foreign policy initiatives with conservative media executives.

The Reagan administration pulled right-wing media executives Rupert Murdoch and Richard Mellon Scaife into a CIA-organized “perception management” operation which aimed Cold War-style propaganda at the American people in the 1980s, according to declassified U.S. government records.

Although some records relating to Murdoch remain classified, several documents that have been released indicate that he and billionaire Scaife were considered sources of financial and other support for President Ronald Reagan’s hard-line Central American policies, including the CIA’s covert war in Nicaragua.

A driving force behind creation of Reagan’s extraordinary propaganda bureaucracy was CIA Director William Casey who dispatched the CIA’s top covert action specialist, Walter Raymond Jr., to the National Security Council to oversee the project. According to the documents, Murdoch was brought into the operation in 1983 – when he was still an Australian citizen and his media empire was much smaller than it is today.

Charles Wick, director of the U.S. Information Agency, arranged at least two face-to-face meetings between Murdoch and Reagan, the first on Jan. 18, 1983, when the administration was lining up private financing for its propaganda campaign, according to records at the Reagan presidential library in Simi Valley, California. That meeting also included lawyer and political operative Roy Cohn and his law partner Thomas Bolan.

The Oval Office meeting between Reagan and Murdoch came just five days after NSC Advisor William Clark noted in a Jan. 13, 1983 memo to Reagan the need for non-governmental money to advance the project. “We will develop a scenario for obtaining private funding,” Clark wrote, as cited in an unpublished draft chapter of the congressional Iran-Contra investigation.

Clark then told the President that “Charlie Wick has offered to take the lead. We may have to call on you to meet with a group of potential donors.”

The documents suggest that Murdoch was soon viewed as a source for that funding. In an Aug. 9, 1983 memo summing up the results of a Casey-organized meeting with five leading ad executives regarding how to “sell” Reagan’s aggressive policies in Central America, Raymond referred to Murdoch as if he already were helping out.

In a memo to Clark, entitled “Private Sector Support for Central American Program,” Raymond criticized a more traditional White House outreach program headed by Faith Whittlesey as “preaching to the converted.”

Raymond told Clark that the new project would involve a more comprehensive approach aimed at persuading a majority of Americans to back Reagan’s Central American policies, which included support for right-wing regimes in Guatemala and El Salvador as well as the Contra rebels fighting the leftist Sandinista government of Nicaragua.

“We must move out into the middle sector of the American public and draw them into the ‘support’ column,” Raymond wrote. “A second package of proposals deal with means to market the issue, largely considering steps utilizing public relations specialists – or similar professionals – to help transmit the message.”

To improve the project’s chances for success, Raymond wrote, “we recommended funding via Freedom House or some other structure that has credibility in the political center. Wick, via Murdoch, may be able to draw down added funds for this effort.”

Raymond included similar information in a separate memo to Wick in which Raymond noted that “via Murdock [sic] may be able to draw down added funds” to support the initiative. (Raymond later told me that he was referring to Rupert Murdoch.)

In a March 7, 1984 memo about the “‘Private Funders’ Project,” Raymond referred to Murdoch again in discussing a request for money from longtime CIA-connected journalist Brian Crozier, who was “looking for private sector funding to work on the question of ‘anti-Americanism’ overseas.”

Raymond wrote: “I am pursuaded [sic] it is a significant long term problem. It is also the kind of thing that Ruppert [sic] and Jimmy might respond positively to. Please look over the stack [of papers from Crozier] and lets [sic] discuss if and when there might be further discussion with our friends.”

Crozier, who died in 2012, had a long history of operating in the shadowy world of CIA propaganda. He was director of Forum World Features, which was set up in 1966 by the Congress for Cultural Freedom, which received covert funding from the CIA. Crozier also acknowledged in his memoir keeping some of his best stories for the CIA.

At least one other document related to Murdoch’s work with USIA Director Wick remains classified, according to the National Archives. Murdoch’s News Corp. has not responded to requests for comment about the Reagan-era documents.

Helping Murdoch

Murdoch, who became a naturalized citizen of the United States in 1985 to meet a regulatory requirement that U.S. TV stations must be owned by Americans, benefited from his close ties to both U.S. and British officialdom.

On Monday, the UK’s Independent reported that Ed Richards, the retiring head of the British media regulatory agency Ofcom, accused British government representatives of showing favoritism to Murdoch’s companies.

Richards said he was “surprised” by the informality, closeness and frequency of contact between executives and ministers during the failed bid by Murdoch’s News Corp. for the satellite network BSkyB in 2011. The deal was abandoned when it was discovered that journalists at Murdoch’s News of the World tabloid had hacked the phone of murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler and others.

“What surprised everyone about it – not just me – was quite how close it was and the informality of it,” Richards said, confirming what had been widely reported regarding Murdoch’s access  to powerful British politicians dating back at least to the reign of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in the 1980s. The Reagan documents suggest that Murdoch built similarly close ties to leading U.S. politicians in the same era.

In 1983, Murdoch’s rising media empire was still based in Australia with only a few U.S. properties, such as the Star tabloid and the New York Post. But he was eyeing expansion into the U.S. media market. In 1984, he bought a stake in 20th Century Fox and then six Metromedia television stations, which would form the nucleus of Fox Broadcasting Company, which was founded on Oct. 9, 1986.

At the time, Murdoch and other media moguls were lobbying for a relaxation of regulations from the Federal Communications Commission, a goal that Reagan shared. Under FCC Chairman Mark Fowler, the Reagan administration undertook a number of steps favorable to Murdoch’s interests, including increasing the number of TV stations that any single entity could own from seven in 1981 to 12 in 1985.

In 1987, the “Fairness Doctrine,” which required political balance in broadcasting, was eliminated, which enabled Murdoch to pioneer a more aggressive conservatism on his TV network. In the mid-1990s, Murdoch expanded his political reach by founding the neoconservative Weekly Standard in 1995 and Fox News on cable in 1996. At Fox News, Murdoch has hired scores of prominent politicians, mostly Republicans, putting them on his payroll as commentators.

Last decade, Murdoch continued to expand his reach into U.S. mass media, acquiring DirecTV and the financial news giant Dow Jones, including The Wall Street Journal, America’s leading business news journal.

Scaife’s Role

Richard Mellon Scaife exercised his media influence on behalf of Reagan and the conservative cause in a different way. While the scion of the Mellon banking, oil and aluminum fortune did publish a right-wing newspaper in Pittsburgh, the Tribune Review, Scaife mostly served as a financial benefactor for right-wing journalists and think tanks.

Indeed, Scaife was one of the original financiers of what emerged as a right-wing counter-establishment in media and academia, a longstanding goal of key Republicans, including President Richard Nixon who recognized the importance of propaganda as a political weapon.

According to Nixon’s chief of staff H.R. Haldeman, as reported in The Haldeman Diaries, one of Nixon’s pet ideas was to build a network of loyal conservatives in positions of influence. The President was “pushing again on project of building our establishment in press, business, education, etc.,” Haldeman wrote in one entry on Sept. 12, 1970.

Financed by rich conservative foundations and wealthy special interests, Nixon’s brainchild helped tilt politics in favor of the American Right with Richard Mellon Scaife one of the project’s big-money godfathers. By using family foundations, such as Sarah Scaife and Carthage, Scaife joined with other leading right-wing foundations to fund think tanks, such as the Heritage Foundation, which Scaife helped launch in 1973.

In 1978, Nixon’s friend and Treasury Secretary William Simon provided more impetus to this growing machine, declaring in his book, Time for Truth: “Funds generated by business … must rush by the multimillion to the aid of liberty … to funnel desperately needed funds to scholars, social scientists, writers and journalists who understand the relationship between political and economic liberty.”

With Reagan’s inauguration in 1981 – and Casey’s selection as CIA director – Scaife and other right-wing ideologues were in position to merge their private funding with U.S. Government money in pursuit of the administration’s geopolitical goals, including making sure the American people would not break ranks as many did over the Vietnam War.

..

Casey’s Hidden Hand

Casey’s secret role in the propaganda scheme continued well into 1986, as Raymond continued to send progress reports to his old boss, even as Raymond fretted in one memo about the need “to get [Casey] out of the loop.”

The “public diplomacy” operation was “the kind of thing which [Casey] had a broad catholic interest in,” Raymond shrugged during his Iran-Contra deposition. He then offered the excuse that Casey undertook this apparently illegal interference in domestic politics “not so much in his CIA hat, but in his adviser to the president hat.”

Though the Casey-Raymond teamwork ended with the exposure of the Iran-Contra scandal in late 1986 and with Casey’s death on May 6, 1987, its legacy continued with Scaife and other rich right-wingers funding ideological media that protected the flanks of President Reagan, his successor President George H.W. Bush and other Republicans of that era.

For instance, Scaife helped fund the work of Steven Emerson, who played a key role in “discrediting” investigations into whether Reagan’s 1980 campaign had sabotaged President Jimmy Carter’s hostage negotiations with Iran to gain an edge in that pivotal election.

Scaife also helped finance the so-called “Arkansas Project” that pushed hyped and bogus scandals to damage the presidency of Bill Clinton.

Walter Raymond Jr. died on April 16, 2003. Richard Mellon Scaife died on July 4, 2014. But Rupert Murdoch, now 83, remains one of the most powerful media figures on earth, continuing to wield unparalleled influence through his control of Fox News and his vast media empire that stretches around the globe.

More at:


Share the News