May 23, 2024

Pew: 32% of Young People Get Their News from China’s TikTok

Pew: 32% of Young People Get Their News from China’s TikTok

A recent Pew Research Center study reveals a significant increase in Americans, particularly younger adults, turning to TikTok for their news, contrasting with static or declining news consumption on other social media platforms. An alarming 32 percent of Americans aged 18 to 29 turn to the China-owned platform to get their news.

A recent Pew Research Center study reveals a significant increase in Americans, particularly younger adults, turning to TikTok for their news, contrasting with static or declining news consumption on other social media platforms. An alarming 32 percent of Americans aged 18 to 29 turn to the China-owned platform to get their news.

The Pew Research Center stated in a recent study that in a landscape where traditional social media platforms are witnessing a plateau or decline in news dissemination, TikTok has emerged as a notable exception. According to a study conducted by the Pew Research Center, there has been a substantial increase in the number of U.S. adults who regularly get their news from TikTok. This trend starkly contrasts with the patterns observed on other major social media sites, where news consumption has either remained stagnant or experienced a downturn in recent years.

The data shows a remarkable increase in the percentage of U.S. adults turning to TikTok for news – from a mere three percent in 2020 to 14 percent in 2023. This shift is especially pronounced among younger demographics. TikTok, primarily known for its short-form video content, has gained immense popularity among teenagers and young adults. Two-thirds of teenagers report using the platform, and it is increasingly becoming a news source for them.

The study highlights a significant generational divide in news consumption on social media. Among adults aged 18 to 29, 32 percent report regularly getting news from TikTok, a higher percentage than in previous years. This contrasts with only 15 percent of those aged 30 to 49, seven percent of those aged 50 to 64, and a mere three percent of those over 65.

As Breitbart New reported, TikTok, owned by a hostile foreign nation, has already shown itself to be be meddling in other country’s business, a national security threat, as well as a danger to teens and kids.

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The Gen Zers who think Osama Bin Laden is an anti-capitalist freedom fighter: How influencer who quit her Amazon job to make $9,000 a month online became poster girl for Tiktokers enthusiastically sharing 9/11 terror mastermind’s Letter To America

The Gen Zers who think Bin Laden is an anti-capitalist freedom fighter

Lynette Adkins was among a host of social media users to post their reactions to the letter, which the al-Qaeda leader wrote in an attempt to justify the 9/11 attacks in 2001.

A Gen Z influener who became the poster girl for TikTokers enthusiastically sharing Osama Bin Laden’s ‘Letter to America’ is a champagne socialist who quit her corporate job at Amazon to make influencer videos, it has been revealed.

Lynette Adkins was among a host of social media users to post their reactions to the letter, which the al-Qaeda leader wrote in an attempt to justify the 9/11 attacks in New York, Pennsylvania and Virginia that killed nearly 3,000.

Video creators appeared to equate the terror chief’s views on Palestine with showing solidarity with Palestinian people amid the ongoing Israel-Hamas war, with some responding to his comments by saying: ‘My eyes have been opened.’

Adkins, from Austin, Texas, was one of the first and most prominent TikTokers to share the letter on her account, which had a following of more than 177,000 but today appears to have been removed.

The viral trend then went into overdrive when American journalist Yashar Ali posted a compilation video of TikTokers’ reactions, including that of Adkins.

The supercut has been viewed more than 32 million times, more than 16 times the total number of views of the original TikToks which used the #lettertoamerica hashtag. The app has since removed this hashtag.

Nevertheless, the Gen Z fascination with the letter appears to have been organic, with one influencer telling Rolling Stone she had seen clips encouraging people to read the document as long as a week ago, before they eventually appeared ‘all over’ her For You page.

Adkins told viewers: ‘I need everyone to stop doing what they’re doing right now and go read ‘Letter to America,’ I feel like I’m going through an existential crisis right now.’ 

The content creator, who also has more than 36,000 followers on Instagram, became a social media star after she used her platforms to moan about working in a corporate job for Amazon.

After less than a year in the role, she quit to become an influencer full-time – documenting the process for all to see – and in one month alone made nearly $9,000 (£7,200) through her videos and brand sponsorship.

Before hitting the social media big bucks, she began working aged 15 in San Antonio in a bid to ease the financial load on her estate agent father and her mother, who works for an insurance company.

Many of her videos denounce corporate culture, and other users who picked up the Letter to America as a result of her sharing it appear to be equating Bin Laden to an anti-capitalist freedom fighter.

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TOO LATE: US Army Removes COVID Vaccine Requirement for Recruits Following Historic Low in Recruitment Since 1973

The United States Army has removed the COVID-19 vaccine requirement for new recruits.

The Army’s recruitment challenges have been mounting in recent years, exacerbated by the stringent COVID-19 vaccine mandates that were previously in place.

Recruiting has been hampered by COVID-19 vaccine requirements as well as an increasingly woke military atmosphere where trans soldiers are give special privileges while Christian soldiers are persecuted, bases host drag shows, and leaders with a history of anti-white statements are hired.

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin mandated the experimental COVID-19 vaccine for all military personnel on August 24, 2021, and like thousands of others across the Department of Defense (DOD).

In March 2022, the U.S. Army joined the other branches of the US military in their efforts to purge the ranks of all vaccine dissenters and announced the separation of three soldiers who refused to take the experimental jab. This is the first time the military branch has discharged soldiers over the mandate.

Also included in this initial round of cuts were six Army leaders who were stripped of their ranks, including two battalion commanders. There were also over 3,250 citations handed out to soldiers who are still refusing to comply with the mandate, according to a US Army statement released on March 18th.

In June 2022, up to 40,000 Army Guard troops are still unvaccinated, and at least 7,000 are at risk of being dismissed after refusing to take the experimental COVID-19 vaccine as the deadline for shots looms.

“According to data obtained by The Associated Press, between 20% to 30% of the Guard soldiers in six states are not vaccinated, and more than 10% in 43 other states still need shots,” the news outlet reported.

In July 2022, nearly 40,000 Army National Guard personnel who refused to take the experimental COVID-19 vaccine after the deadline will be barred from participating in federal training and may face financial fines or possible expulsion.

“Beginning July 1, 2022, members of the Army National Guard and U.S. Army Reserve who have refused the lawful DOD COVID-19 vaccination order without an approved or pending exemption may not participate in federally funded drills and training and will not receive pay or retirement credit,” Army said in a statement.

According to authorities from the National Guard who spoke with CBS News, 14,000 of the more than 40,000 members of the Guard who have not been vaccinated against COVID-19 have said that they have no plans to obtain the vaccination in the future.

Soldiers who remain unvaccinated will miss weekend drills and lose their competency, which might lead to dismissal.

“Soldiers who refuse the vaccination order without an approved or pending exemption request are subject to adverse administrative actions, including flags, bars to service, and official reprimands. In the future, Soldiers who continue to refuse the vaccination order without an exemption may be subject to additional adverse administrative action, including separation,” Army said.

“As of June 30, The Army National Guard is at 89% vaccinated with one dose and 87% fully vaccinated. The Army Reserve is at 89% vaccinated with one dose and 88% fully vaccinated.”

In October 2022, military leaders announced they would be lowering their recruiting goal for the Army from 476,000 to about 466,000. Despite lowering this goal, the U.S Army is reporting it will miss recruiting goals for the year by 15,000 soldiers, or 25% of the goal.

The U.S. Army’s 2022 recruiting year was its worst since the end of the draft in 1973. The Army missed its goal of 60,000 new soldiers by approximately 25 percent.

According to Army Times, “The Army fell about 15,000 soldiers — or 25% — short of its recruitment goal this [2022], officials confirmed Friday, despite a frantic effort to make up the widely expected gap in a year when all the military services struggled in a tight jobs market to find young people willing and fit to enlist.”

The current fiscal year is likely to be even worse. The shortfall forced the Army to cut its planned active-duty end strength from 476,000 to 466,000, but according to the War on The Rocks outlet, “Army officials project that active end strength could shrink by as much as 20,000 soldiers by September, down to 445,000. That means that the nation’s primary land force could plummet by as much as 7 percent in only two years — at a time when its missions are increasing in Europe and even in the Pacific, where the Army provides many of the critical wartime theater enablers without which the other services cannot function.“

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From James Woods:

“My father fought in the Korean War. I miss him with all my heart, yet I am grateful he never had to see an American serviceman holding a communist Chinese flag.”

James Woods on Twitter: “My father fought in the Korean War. I miss him with all my heart, yet I am grateful he never had to see an American serviceman holding a communist Chinese flag. pic.twitter.com/ACk9GgXK00 / Twitter”

My father fought in the Korean War. I miss him with all my heart, yet I am grateful he never had to see an American serviceman holding a communist Chinese flag. pic.twitter.com/ACk9GgXK00


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