November 30, 2021

CDC redefines ‘vaccine’ in wake of mRNA jab’s plunging efficacy

WASHINGTON (LifeSiteNews) — The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) quietly updated its definition of “vaccine” and “vaccination” on September 1 from providing “immunity” to merely providing “protection.”

Between 2015 and August 2021, the CDC had defined a vaccine as “[a] product that stimulates a person’s immune system to produce immunity to a specific disease, protecting the person from that disease.”

But following increasing skepticism over the term “vaccine” being applied to the newly developed mRNA jabs against COVID-19 from experts in medicine, the CDC adjusted the definition at the beginning of September, now describing a vaccine as “[a] preparation that is used to stimulate the body’s immune response against diseases.”

Similarly, the word “vaccinating” is now, according to the CDC’s definition, less specific about the level of resistance a subject should receive from the medication.

Between 2015 and August 2021, the definition of vaccination provided by the CDC was “[t]he act of introducing a vaccine into the body to produce immunity to a specific disease.” Now, the word “immunity” has been dropped in favor of the less precise term “protection” to define vaccination as “[t]he act of introducing a vaccine into the body to produce protection from a specific disease.”

Rep. Thomas Massie (R-KY) highlighted on Twitter that the term “vaccination” had undergone a definitional overhaul already in 2015. Previously, the CDC had described vaccination more specifically as an “injection of a killed or weakened infectious organism in order to prevent the disease” the shot was designed to protect against.

https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/cdc-redefines-vaccine-in-wake-of-mrna-jabs-plunging-efficacy/