May 21, 2022

Spike protein in COVID virus and shots weakens immune system, may be linked with cancer: Swedish study

‘We found that the spike protein localizes in the nucleus and inhibits DNA damage repair.’

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The study, titled “SARS–CoV–2 Spike Impairs DNA Damage Repair and Inhibits V(D)J Recombination In Vitro,” was released by the Department of Molecular Biosciences of Stockholm University, and began by discussing the enormous impact of the COVID-19 disease on the world today, and the necessity of healthy adaptive immunity for individuals to fight off the SARS–CoV–2 infection.

Yet, the researchers highlight how multiple clinical studies indicate “that patients with severe COVID–19 exhibit delayed and weak adaptive immune responses” for reasons that have remained unclear.

Offering a possible answer to this question, the authors “report that the SARS–CoV–2 spike protein significantly inhibits DNA damage repair, which is required for effective V(D)J recombination in adaptive immunity.”

“Mechanistically, we found that the spike protein localizes in the nucleus and inhibits DNA damage repair,” they wrote. “Our findings reveal a potential molecular mechanism by which the spike protein might impede adaptive immunity and underscore the potential side effects of full-length spike-based vaccines.”

In an online lecture explaining the study, Dr. Mobeen Syed emphasized how B cells and T cells, which are part of the adaptive immune system, each have a certain variation for attaching to a particular invading antigen. This “variability is produced by intentionally damaging the DNA [of each cell] and then repairing it.

A Swedish lab study released in mid-October found that the spike protein associated with the COVID-19 illness, and its experimental vaccines, enters the nucleus of cells and significantly interferes with DNA damage-repair functions compromising a person’s adaptive immunity and perhaps encouraging the formation of cancer cells.

The study, titled “SARS–CoV–2 Spike Impairs DNA Damage Repair and Inhibits V(D)J Recombination In Vitro,” was released by the Department of Molecular Biosciences of Stockholm University, and began by discussing the enormous impact of the COVID-19 disease on the world today, and the necessity of healthy adaptive immunity for individuals to fight off the SARS–CoV–2 infection.

Yet, the researchers highlight how multiple clinical studies indicate “that patients with severe COVID–19 exhibit delayed and weak adaptive immune responses” for reasons that have remained unclear.

Offering a possible answer to this question, the authors “report that the SARS–CoV–2 spike protein significantly inhibits DNA damage repair, which is required for effective V(D)J recombination in adaptive immunity.”

“Mechanistically, we found that the spike protein localizes in the nucleus and inhibits DNA damage repair,” they wrote. “Our findings reveal a potential molecular mechanism by which the spike protein might impede adaptive immunity and underscore the potential side effects of full-length spike-based vaccines.”

In an online lecture explaining the study, Dr. Mobeen Syed emphasized how B cells and T cells, which are part of the adaptive immune system, each have a certain variation for attaching to a particular invading antigen. This “variability is produced by intentionally damaging the DNA [of each cell] and then repairing it.

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